Home  •  Next Meeting  •  Contact Us  •  iCal  •  Check Email

MacGroup-Detroit    MacGroup iBBS    MacGroup iBBS  Hop To Forum Categories  Desktop Publishing    What format should images be in for Microsoft Word?
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
What format should images be in for Microsoft Word?
 Login/Register
 
Jedi Knight
Picture of artphanto
posted
I rarely use Microsoft Word, but have a friend that uses it for forms and invoices. I was asked to create a logo that they could use for these forms (the logo is an illustrator eps file). What is the best format to save it in so that we can put it on multiple forms and documents in word?

They also want me to create a word template for a letterhead. Frown I hate word

Thanks for any advice!
Natalie
 
Posts: 462 | Location: Livonia | Registered: September 16, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Council Member
posted Hide Post
I don't use Word either, on a regular basis. But, since it's a Microsoft program, I'd recommend saving the file in various formats, and see which one works the best for the intended output - whether from an inkjet, laser printer or a commercial printer. Many commercial printers will not accept Word files for print.

Off-hand, your best bet would be to save the Illustrator .eps file as a high-res JPG (at 300 ppi to size). The original .eps may work also. While going through the process of re-saving, or exporting the original file to another format, look for any format that may be PC compatible. Microsoft and Word is all about PC and Windows.
 
Posts: 684 | Registered: February 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Knight
Picture of artphanto
posted Hide Post
Thanks Mike! Smile
 
Posts: 462 | Location: Livonia | Registered: September 16, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Guru
Picture of Jack Beckman
posted Hide Post
It depends also on if this is Word for Windows or Word for the Mac. I have had graphics that look fine in Word for Mac come out as garbage when the document was moved to a Windows machine and visa versa.


===
Professor Hubert Farnsworth: “Nothing is impossible. Not if you can imagine it. That’s what being a scientist is all about.”
Cubert J. Farnsworth: “No, that’s what being a magical elf is all about.”

 
Posts: 5470 | Location: Sterling Heights, Mi | Registered: January 25, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
TIFF's usually work well, or as well as can be expected, with Office Mac 2008.
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Knight
Picture of artphanto
posted Hide Post
it will be going to a pc. I think I have used .jpg before-I assume that will work ok?
 
Posts: 462 | Location: Livonia | Registered: September 16, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Guru
Picture of Jack Beckman
posted Hide Post
Try it first - I don't think you can safely assume anything.


===
Professor Hubert Farnsworth: “Nothing is impossible. Not if you can imagine it. That’s what being a scientist is all about.”
Cubert J. Farnsworth: “No, that’s what being a magical elf is all about.”

 
Posts: 5470 | Location: Sterling Heights, Mi | Registered: January 25, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
You probably want to start with a vector graphic, and develop different size raster graphics (*.tiffs) from that.

*.jpegs don't render edges clearly and alter color, but it is a compressed file, which minimizes storage needs somewhat after many letters are stored. It's not worth the savings.

A .jpeg isn't very scalable, and looks bad when scaled. The edges will be cleaner using a *.tiff, but the color won't shift on different output devices.

You'll need to provide multiple raster file resolutions for multiple applications, e.g., large and small logos for letterhead, and even larger *.tifs for signs, etc.

Why don't you develop a vector-based file in Illustrator, and then derive a couple *.tiff-based letterhead template files in MS Word? (The *.tif letterheads will be almost idiot-proof workflows that non-skilled people just have to recall from disk.) That's what all the big firms do. If your client needs another size graphic for another purpose (for instance, mailing labels, bumper stickers, window logos, banners, logos on promotional items), it's easy to develop them from the original vector graphic (with the right software, of course).

Look at the attached file below. The *.tif didn't alter color, but blurred edges slightly on enlarging. The *.jpeg altered the color (added blue & black!) and really blurred the edges. You need to do business in archival file formats.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Chuck M,

 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Council Member
posted Hide Post
Natalie,

Chances are that you probably know this already. If you decide to use TIF, you can also compress the file during the save with LZW Compression. LZW Compression is non-lossy. Since you're saving for PC, you can also select the Byte Order, IBM PC.
 
Posts: 684 | Registered: February 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Knight
Picture of Kirk Tirakian
posted Hide Post
My Illustrator CS has a separate stand alone "Save for Microsoft Office" function under "File". Is Adobe trying to tell us something cause it is saving the resulting file as a png?
Wikipedia talks about pngs.
"PNG is a better choice than JPEG for storing images that contain text, line art, or other images with sharp transitions. " -Wiki


I'm never "lost" cause I always know where "I" am. I just may not know where anything else is or how to get there.
 
Posts: 405 | Location: Roseville, Michigan | Registered: December 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post



  Powered by Social Strata  
 

MacGroup-Detroit    MacGroup iBBS    MacGroup iBBS  Hop To Forum Categories  Desktop Publishing    What format should images be in for Microsoft Word?

© MacGroup-Detroit 2016

Next Meeting | Join Now | News | About MacGroup | Check Your Mail