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Jedi Master
Picture of Paul
posted
Does anyone know of any PC laptops that come with built-in HSDPA (3G) cards. I'm thinking not, since the cards most likely would have to be supplied by a cell phone carrier, but I thought I would at least ask. Word on the street is that ATT is going to coming out with their own laptops.

The reason I am asking is that the company I work for is set to make a bulk purchase. My boss wants to make a shift in the way the Sales Reps handle clients and connect to the office while on the road. He's thinking of purchasing each a laptop and Blackberry along with the cell phone plan to go with it all.


========================
Ignorance breeds fear and fear breeds stupidity. Knowledge is the key to overcoming your fears

The only fish in a stream that just "go with the flow" are the dead ones
 
Posts: 1421 | Location: Clawson, MI USA | Registered: July 25, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
iBBS Addict
Picture of James R. Cutler
posted Hide Post
According to one person at the Brighton Verizon store, the BlackBerry® 8830 World Edition works fine tethered. It should work with SIM cards in other countries. The individual plan for this device is about the same as phone plus wireless card.
 
Posts: 1979 | Registered: January 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Guru
Picture of Jack Beckman
AIM: Online Status For jcbeckman@mac.com
posted Hide Post
There are several netbooks that I can find announced with cards built-in, but no full PCs I can find.

Not sure why you'd want them built in - if you get the card separate you can get them for whatever carrier you want, instead of having to buy a whole computer based on the carrier.


===
Professor Hubert Farnsworth: “Nothing is impossible. Not if you can imagine it. That’s what being a scientist is all about.”
Cubert J. Farnsworth: “No, that’s what being a magical elf is all about.”

 
Posts: 5470 | Location: Sterling Heights, Mi | Registered: January 25, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
iBBS Addict
Picture of James R. Cutler
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Jack Beckman:
Not sure why you'd want them built in - if you get the card separate you can get them for whatever carrier you want, instead of having to buy a whole computer based on the carrier.

Not sure why you'd want them built in - if you get the card separate you can get them for whatever computer you want, instead of having to select a network based on the computer.

(or iPhone!)
 
Posts: 1979 | Registered: January 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
Yes, I do know of laptops with built-in 3G cards (actually chips). I agree with Jack, and that's why you don't find built-in 3G cards. The laptop manufacturers don't want to force their customers into a specific telco relationship. "Generic" chips that handle all the different forms of 3G/4G encoding are too expensive. Also, an internal antenna ("built-in 3G) is NEVER going to have the range and sensitivity of an external antenna (i.e., ExpressCard or USB dongle). Laptop cases and human body proximity make pretty good Faraday cages. So tell your fumble-fingered sales reps not to break off their external antenna dongles, or lose them. Smile

Take the W-I-D-E view. You might have to test some hardware to get the information you want.

We're still in the early adoption stages of 3G, and 4G is essentially unavailable. It would be very easy to make a bad choice of carrier today. You'd better do your homework correctly in this time of "telco's" transition.

The telco's have one eye on their chessboard, and their other eye on their competitors, watching for somebody to blink, or somebody to make the first move in introducing new 3G/4G business plans. The old business models are cash cows, and will still be used for a few more months. VOIP is going to be a big factor in the new business plans, so you might want to research that feature too.

Search for "3G" in these articles for some advice:


Or, check this out: Google Search 3G 4G

I'm not sure how fast 4G (WiMAX) networks are going to be introduced. Sprint's WiMAX coverage map is here.

I know that AT&T has 3G problems, so you can't simply rely on a carrier's coverage area as an indicator of availability or quality of service. AT&T's "throttled" 3G network is the problem with Apple's iPhone bandwidth and connectivity.

From The Definitive Coast-to-Coast 3G Data Test:

quote:
After all this extensive testing, we don't think results have much to do with your platform or laptop of choice — even the USB dongles' antennae didn't have as much relevance as sheer position to the cell tower.





 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
Caught this on the "wire" today. It's somewhat related to Paul's original question, regarding service quality, and to a lesser extent, international use of 3G/4G data networks for salesmen in the field. Verizon doesn't use the "international standard" of GSM, but CDMA. Tethering may be coming to the next gen iPhone software, but who really knows? Tethering might be a potential solution for Paul et. al.

From Wired's Gadget Lab:

quote:
4 Reasons Apple Should Share the iPhone With Verizon

By Brian X. Chen April 17, 2009 | 3:21:42 PMCategories: Apple, IPhone

Apple is more likely to bring the iPhone to Verizon once the cellular company deploys its fourth-generation network, claims Verizon's chief executive.
That's because Apple was never very interested in Verizon's current CDMA cellular standard, which is less popular among cellphone networks outside North America, Verizon CEO Ivan Seidenberg told The Wall Street Journal.

Therefore, Verizon's upgrade to 4G in 2010 should rectify the issue. Verizon will adopt a standard called Long Term Evolution (LTE), which many domestic and international carriers plan to use for their next-generation networks as well. For Apple, that should mean more potential iPhone customers and fewer troubles in terms of hardware production.

But wait. Didn't Verizon say in 2007 that it rejected Apple's iPhone, rather than the other way around? Then, Verizon complained about Apple's control over distribution, which is a non-issue now that iPhones are being sold in Wal-mart, Best Buy and AT&T stores. Verizon also moaned about Apple's desire to handle all the customer care — but that shouldn't be a problem anymore, either, since Apple is the big leader in the latest customer satisfaction survey.

Still, Verizon spurned Apple. And Apple could lose face if it warms up to Verizon so easily after such an emphatic rejection. We're not satisfied that scoring the iPhone will be so easy for Verizon, but we definitely think it would be a wise, crucial move for Apple. Below is a list of reasons why we think a deal makes sense. If you agree, we encourage you to add your own reasons. If you disagree, well, we welcome those comments, too.

Verizon's Reputation for Its Superior Network

Let's start with the obvious: Everyone will agree that Verizon generally has better call and data quality than AT&T. Surveys say so, too. Many Verizon customers resist the iPhone because they don't wish to sacrifice reliable call reception and consistently zippy downloads.
We're not taking sides here, but AT&T has the opposite reputation. "Dropped calls" and "no signal" are phrases commonly heard when discussing AT&T's service quality. By expanding to Verizon, Apple will undoubtedly further its iPhone penetration in the United States.

Sharing Is Caring

AT&T will never, ever admit this, but its current 3G networks are evidently overloaded, due in large part to the iPhone's booming success . In August, Wired.com conducted a global study showing that iPhone data speeds were suffering on the U.S. AT&T network, when compared to Europe's fine-tuned 3G networks. And several iPhone customers have been so dissatisfied with network issues that they filed lawsuits accusing Apple of making false advertisements about the iPhone 3G's performance.
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Donna
posted Hide Post
David Pogue reviewed this today
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05...c=rss&pagewanted=all

It is coming on Verizon and not just for Windows.
 
Posts: 2284 | Location: Ann Arbor MI USA | Registered: October 22, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Past President
Picture of Terry White
AIM: Online Status For terrywhite at mac dot com
posted Hide Post
Very cool device! In the meantime you can stick your existing card in a a Cradlepoint Router to get the same thing.

quote:
Originally posted by Chuck M:
Novatel intros MiFi 3G portable hotspots



----
You can never go wrong by doing the right thing.

http://terrywhite.com

There are two kinds of computer users: those who have lost data and those who are about to — backup your Mac!
 
Posts: 6152 | Location: Atlanta, GA | Registered: June 10, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Guru
Picture of Jack Beckman
AIM: Online Status For jcbeckman@mac.com
posted Hide Post
And if AT&T ever gets its act together, you'll be able to tether an iPhone instead of buying a separate card (once the 3.0 software is out). Users of Blackberries and some other phones already have this as an option, generally for half as much per month as using a separate card.


===
Professor Hubert Farnsworth: “Nothing is impossible. Not if you can imagine it. That’s what being a scientist is all about.”
Cubert J. Farnsworth: “No, that’s what being a magical elf is all about.”

 
Posts: 5470 | Location: Sterling Heights, Mi | Registered: January 25, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post



Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
Apple adding hooks for native 3G in Snow Leopard?

quote:
The move (3G inclusion) implies that Apple plans to make 3G a factory option, likely internally, for one or more of its computers.


This news may not solve your Windows problem, but it may solve some other problems. This news might imply that Apple & AT&T are serious about iPhone tethering. We'll know by WWDC 2009 (1 month away).

How many pieces of junk do your salesmen want to carry around? Dongles get busted off, forgotten, or lost. Only netbooks are really getting built-in WiFi. But then your salesmen still need dongles ( Big Grin magnifying glasses Eek ).

RIM's getting more competitive with their phone features - they have a ways to go on their operating system. The Storm is the only model you can read without 20/20 vision. Internet access isn't so good either. The phone makers and carriers are in a race for survival, and the losers won't be around after that. They all need features and apps, a good OS, and a good network. Enterprise and consumer phones are beginning to merge.
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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