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Jedi Knight
Picture of Rhonda
posted
I want to import some photos into my imovie video. What should they be cropped to so that they fill up the entire frame? Is it 720x480 pix or 720x576 px? Or, not either one of those.

Thanks.
Rhonda
 
Posts: 280 | Location: West Bloomfield, Mi. | Registered: July 26, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
Play with the resolutions a little bit.

I don't know how iMovie works on imported photos presently. I have iMovie 3, and I don't know what version you have.

Both of the resolutions you mention are too high to be displayed in their entirety on a standard definition TV (NTSC). But, maybe it doesn't matter if you get what you want in the frame after iMovie crops it and downsizes it.

You can look up SDTV resolutions on the web, but it's something like 600W x 380H in actual fact on an analog TV. You might get the full 640 x 480 on a digital TV.

So play with it a little bit.
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Council Member
Picture of Jamie
posted Hide Post
Rhonda,

You may not need to crop prior to importing. I will often import a larger image than I need and crop it in iMovie. What version do you have?

In iMovie HD, you can go to Media > Photos and click on Show Photo Settings when you have a highlighted photo. You can move it around or zoom in as you wish with or without using the Ken Burns effect.


Jamie
 
Posts: 554 | Location: West Bloomfield | Registered: June 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
iBBS Addict
posted Hide Post
Rhonda:

The biggest concern when doing a movie with photos is to make sure you maintain a 4 x 3 aspect ratio (standard TV). If this is to be formatted for new widescreen TV's then use a 16 x 9 aspect ratio. The photo resolution is not as important.

The following information was found by Google doing a search for "NTSC Resolution".

NTSC Format

NTSC stands for the National Television Standards Committee. It is a video signal standard used by the color television industry in the United States and Japan.

The NTSC is a common format used by many video compression boards.

NTSC video contains frames and fields. Most NTSC video frames consist of two interlaced fields. Each field is displayed as alternating horizontal lines across the screen. Most computer video formats are non-interlaced.

The frame aspect ratio used by the NTSC standard format is 4:3. This format uses a 640 by 480 resolution.

By using the NTSC standard for digital video, there are two areas of concern when dealing with aspect ratios. They are as follows:

• Pixel aspect ratio

• Frame aspect ratio

There are various divisions within the NTSC standard which determine what pixel and frame aspect ratios are used. These formats are as follows:

• NTSC (resolution 648 x 486 - preferred format)

• D-1 NTSC (resolution 720 x 486)

• D-1 NTSC Square Pix (resolution 720 x 540)

NTSC (Preferred Format)

This NTSC format uses a 648 by 486 resolution format. This format makes an allowance for a few additional pixels to be created on the screen edge that may be cut off when displayed. This format is also commonly used by many video compression boards.

Because this format allows you to display a video without losing the "edges" of your video during playback, this resolution seems to be the preference within the industry.

D-1 NTSC

The D-1 NTSC format uses the same standard frame aspect ratio as the NTSC format. Unlike the NTSC format, the D-1 NTSC format uses a 720 by 486 resolution using rectangular pixels.

The D-1 pixels used in the NTSC format are displayed using a vertical axis.

D-1 NTSC Square Pix

This format uses the same standard frame aspect ratio as the NTSC format. Unlike the NTSC format, the D-1 NTSC Square Pix uses a 720 by 540 resolution using rectangular pixels.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Brian Stone,
 
Posts: 1658 | Location: Oak Park, MI, USA | Registered: January 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Knight
Picture of Rhonda
posted Hide Post
quote:
)

I am using the latest edition of IMovie and acutally have not made a video with it yet. In the previous version, I was not happy with how some of the photos looked as I had cropped them to 720x480. I had used this setting in another video program using windows. I didn't realize that imovie had different settings. I prefer to crop before bringing the photo into imovie. I will play around with some of the resolutions suggested. Thanks.
Rhonda
 
Posts: 280 | Location: West Bloomfield, Mi. | Registered: July 26, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
iBBS Addict
Picture of James R. Cutler
posted Hide Post
The last time I checked, I found explicit settings for still picture sizes in the application help.
 
Posts: 1989 | Registered: January 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
iBBS Addict
Picture of CHunter
posted Hide Post
Rhonda, if you have or are using iPhoto also, I seem to remember
that iPhoto has a 4x3 tool/setting for cropping an image. I believe I
used it for the same purpose of keeping the image proportional to
keep the black edges away/fill the screen during a movie I was creating.

With iPhoto now being non-destructive to images, and you can keep
the image where you want in on your hard drive, it may be helpful.
 
Posts: 1631 | Registered: June 16, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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