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Jedi Master
Picture of janp
posted
A friend filmed the Polar express train in Saginaw in HD. He edited it in Iphoto HD and now would like to make some DVDs in full HD format. Any ideas?
 
Posts: 1057 | Location: dearbon,MI , USA | Registered: June 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Past President
Picture of Terry White
posted Hide Post
Currently Burning HD DVDs is the missing piece of the puzzle right now on the Mac. Although you can shoot in HD and edit in HD, the Macs don't have built-in Blu-ray or HD DVD burners/readers yet. So you will have to find a 3rd party solution. Toast 8 (which I bought at Macworld expo, but haven't received yet) touts the ability to burn HD Discs. However, you need to find a compatible external burner.

I haven't done any research on burners at this point, because there are so few players out there.

I did get a Playstation 3 which can play Blu-ray discs and while the quality is great, it is not night and day better (to my eyes). LG announced a hybrid player at CES that can play both HD DVDs and Blu-ray DVDs for $1,299. So the battle rages on, but there has yet to be mass appeal. The two main reasons are, no one wants to pick the wrong player and secondly there aren't a ton of movie titles in either format yet. Also the entry price of $500 and up is not that appealing.

Once Apple builds the burners into their computers, things might loosen up a bit. So sit back and enjoy the ride. It's going to be a long one.


----
You can never go wrong by doing the right thing.

http://terrywhite.com

There are two kinds of computer users: those who have lost data and those who are about to — backup your Mac!
 
Posts: 6154 | Location: Atlanta, GA | Registered: June 10, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Master
Picture of janp
posted Hide Post
another person offered this: "it can only be done with DVD Studio Pro and playable in Macs only"
 
Posts: 1057 | Location: dearbon,MI , USA | Registered: June 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Past President
Picture of Terry White
posted Hide Post
Yes and No, that's only if you were building a DVD on your hard drive. Once the burners ship, it should play in any Blu-ray (if that's the format you go with) or HD DVD Player (if you go that route).


----
You can never go wrong by doing the right thing.

http://terrywhite.com

There are two kinds of computer users: those who have lost data and those who are about to — backup your Mac!
 
Posts: 6154 | Location: Atlanta, GA | Registered: June 10, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
While other contributors have identified obvious problems with "HD" camcorders, there is ONE not-so-obvious problem.

There are no HD camcorders, that I'm aware of. There are professional HD cameras.

There are all kinds of claims of HD and HDV camcorders on the market, but I'm not aware of any with the requisite recording bandwidth, or optical resolution. Camcorders that record to HDV tape automatically disqualify themselves as high definition. You cannot use DV tape to record HD resolution and HD audio. It doesn't "fit."

A hard drive camcorder is capable of enough throughput to record HD, but most don't have the requisite optical resolution on the CCD's, or in the lenses available. Lens quality is a BIG issue, and so far, the manufacturers haven't delivered anything close to HD lenses. Most CCD chips are 50% to 75% undersized to deliver HD.

So, you're getting something other than HD, even if you're paying HD prices.

For instance, Canon's new XH G1 delivers 1440 x 1080 resolution. But 1080i is 1920 x 1080 pixels. But it could deliver 720p at the very least - couldn't it? Nope. It's only programmed for 1080i. The same is true for Sony, JVC, and Panasonic.

Sony's HDR-FX1 claims to have "Full HD 1080." But it only has 1070K pixels. It's short by 50% of the requisite areal pixels. I'm certain the optical lens is even shorter than that at resolving detail.

The Sony HDR-SR1 has a 30GB hard drive that is rated to hold "4 hours" of video. True 1080i (compressed!) HD video would require 52GB/hour storage capacity. In other words, the SR1 is throwing away about 76% of the image.

I think we may have to wait 5 years for true HD software and hardware to arrive on the market and to be affordable. Blu-ray will probably be here in 2007. I say that with full knowledge of how quickly SD video arrived in 2002. The DV camcorders were already available at that time.
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Knight
posted Hide Post
Be careful of those Sony’ Hard Drive Camera’s & the AVCHD format they use, as I’m not sure it’s that easy to pull the footage to your Mac.
 
Posts: 103 | Registered: July 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
A wise person would let the vendors work through this generation of HD hardware/software problems before buying one.

Stay with SD until they work the "kinks" out.

They've taken a very conservative approach to "HD" standards, which hopefully will be improved through significant upgrades in video and audio quality.
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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