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Poobah
Picture of Bibo (Jim Nichols)
posted
I would like to get a 35mm film scanner and am looking for recommendations. I'd like to go as cheap as possible but still get decent quality that would at least produce an 8 x 10 print.
 
Posts: 2094 | Location: Grand Rapids, MI | Registered: June 10, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
iBBS Addict
posted Hide Post
quote:
35mm film scanner


Go to Amazon and put this into the search box, "35mm film scanner". It came up with over 4 pages of choices. Items were from about $50.00 up, (did not check all items).
 
Posts: 1640 | Location: Oak Park, MI, USA | Registered: January 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Bibo (Jim Nichols)
posted Hide Post
I know how to search, I'm looking for recommendations.
 
Posts: 2094 | Location: Grand Rapids, MI | Registered: June 10, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
Today, the Nikon ED5000 is the best slide scanner available at a mid range price point. Nikon toll free 800 help is also pretty good. It's the only scanner available with a slide feeder that common folk can afford. The ED5000 slide feeder would be needed if you have something like 1000 slides, and it works better than the first generation Nikon feeders. Nevertheless, if your cardboard mount slides are "dog eared," it may not work.

Digital ICE^4 is essential for all but the least discerning aficionado. It removes scratches, watermarks, coloration (from fading or improper processing), and dust from slides. It's amazing how noticeable that stuff becomes in a scan, when it doesn't even show in a slide projector.

A number of scanners offer Digital ICE^4. Canon offers its own brand of slide repair software - FARE - but I suspect you'd get ø (zero) help from them if questions arise.

You may be able to obtain an out-of-print Nikon book on scanning (for FREE from Nikon), or possibly a third-party book on scanning. Scanning is actually quite complicated for discerning photographers, and most instructions don't explain completely what all the software settings actually do. Sometimes you just have to try different settings.

A high resolution slide film like Ektachrome 100 or Fujifilm Astia 100 has a resolution of about 4000 pixels per inch. That should be adequate sharpness for a "straight" digitally-processed inkjet print 8x10 size. You'll need to use Digital ICE^4 and PhotoShop and possibly other software to tune things for your most important shots. It's better to depend on "upstream" functions the most. In decreasing order of importance:

  • Take a good shot to begin with.
  • Process it and store correctly.
  • Scan it correctly.
  • Manipulate in PhotoShop.
  • Print it well.


Another way of saying what I just said is: don't depend on PhotoShop to bail you out when things get really messed up.

Note that Digital ICE^4 doesn't work entirely with Kodachrome film - it doesn't remove scratches in Kodachrome slides. Some people claim that VueScan software does sometimes work on Kodachrome using Digital ICE^4.

I sort of assumed (maybe incorrectly, Bibo) that you're talking about color positive slides. A slide scanner with Digital ICE^4 will work for color negative films and B&W negatives also - to varying degrees. I recommend you embed the scanner profile into your (scanned) digital images using PhotoShop or, better yet, Bridge or Lightroom.
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Bibo (Jim Nichols)
posted Hide Post
Woah, that's almost $1,200! But I remember always hearing great things about Nikon scanners, but way out of my price range.

I mainly have negatives, only a handful of slides.
 
Posts: 2094 | Location: Grand Rapids, MI | Registered: June 10, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Poobah
Picture of Chuck M
posted Hide Post
If you only have a handful of slides, why don't you send them to good service bureau? There might be a few problems with that idea, but let's skip them for now.
 
Posts: 2075 | Registered: June 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Knight
posted Hide Post
If you have a older mac around-something with a 204echip and SCCI drives, you might be able to buy an earlier version of the Nikon Scanner on ebay? You'd then transfer the scanned images by eithernet to your new machine. Even the legacy Nicon scanners used "Digital Ice" technology.
 
Posts: 152 | Location: Commerce Township | Registered: March 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Knight
posted Hide Post
Bebe-I still have a Supermac 900 clone that would work, but no monitor for it. I'm keeping it in case I find a Medium Format Nikon Scanner in a legacy model for cheap. I'd scan "books" of 645 negs of family and vacations. Just waiting for the opportunity. Paul
 
Posts: 152 | Location: Commerce Township | Registered: March 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Jedi Knight
posted Hide Post
This is the link I found in OUR BLOG for outsourcing your slide/film scanning:
http://www.macworld.com/articl...g.html?lsrc=rss_main
 
Posts: 152 | Location: Commerce Township | Registered: March 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Past President
Picture of Terry White
AIM: Online Status For terrywhite at mac dot com
posted Hide Post
I've had great success with ScanCafe.com


----
You can never go wrong by doing the right thing.

http://terrywhite.com

There are two kinds of computer users: those who have lost data and those who are about to — backup your Mac!
 
Posts: 6152 | Location: Atlanta, GA | Registered: June 10, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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